The Prestigious American Bar Association

The American Bar Association was established in 19th century by highly esteemed legal personalities in the United States. One of its foremost objectives is to enhance high quality education among all law colleges and universities in the country.

ABA approved law schools earn a distinct status symbol once they are given official accreditation by this influential organization of legal achievers. Based on statistics, as of February 2010, there are already 199 ABA approved law schools in America.

The U.S. News and World Report started ranking the ABA approved law schools recently as fraction of its highly publicized but quite controversial top ranking schools system. This scheme of classification has not at all established the sanction of the three eminent legal groups namely, the American Bar Association, the Association of American Law Schools, or the Council of Faculties of Law Admissions. As a rule, the rankings are described by the three bureaus as too prejudiced, illogical and self-serving.

They are inclined to control the choices of law students because pinnacle rankings are often interpreted as the basis for hiring legal experts after their graduation. It should be the academic performance and the capability of the students and not the rankings that are considered when it comes to the procedure of employment.

The rankings should not influence the decision of employers in their bid to hire the most qualified lawyers in the land. Again, choices should rather be based on the qualifications of the candidates or if they graduated from ABA approved law schools. Perhaps it would be better if the U.S. News and World Report can mount an information drive to convince students to enroll in ABA approved law schools. This media organization can also try to convince those 40 schools that are not accredited by the American Bar Association to work immediately for their official recognition.